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Kids Section - Egypt Myth

Stop! Read this first

Amulets were magical charms which could be worn on necklaces or bracelets to protect the body from harm. They were also included among the linen wrappings of mummies to protect the deceased. Some amulets represented hieroglyphs that stood for ideas like life, strength, or prosperity. Other amulets took the form of gods or goddesses, or some aspect of the god.


Next! Your instructions.
Below are four Egyptian amulets. Scroll down and select the correct name for each one. Click on the picture to check your answer.

Now! Do it.

Uraeus : A cobra rearing up with a fully puffed-up hood or coiled body.

Wedjat : A human eye with a brow above it and markings below.

Djed Pillar : A tall, broad shaft crossed near the top by four short, horizontal bars.

Two Fingers: The index and middle fingers, usually with fingernails and joints clearly defined.


Ostrich Feathers: Two plumes, side by side, with curled over tops.

Uraeus: A cobra rearing up with a fully puffed-up hood or coiled body.

Isis Knot or Girdle of Isis: A loop of fabric over a long sash with two folded loops on either side.

Two Fingers: The index and middle fingers, usually with fingernails and joints clearly defined.

Isis Knot or Girdle of Isis: A loop of fabric over a long sash with two folded loops on either side.

Uraeus: A cobra rearing up with a fully puffed-up hood or coiled body.

Wedjat: A human eye with a brow above it and markings below.

Djed Pillar: A tall, broad shaft crossed near the top by four short, horizontal bars.

(Remember to click on the pictures to check your answer!)

Wedjat: A human eye with a brow above and markings below.

Ostrich Feathers: Two plumes, side by side, with curled over tops.

Two Fingers: The index and middle fingers, usually with fingernails and joints clearly defined.

Uraeus: A cobra rearing up with a fully puffed-up hood or coiled body.

Wait! One final thought.


Think about the "charms" we wear on bracelets and necklaces. What meaning do they have for us? You're now ready to move on to another area of discovery! Click on something below.

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Last Updated: June 1st, 2011