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Egyptian Exhibitions throughout the world from Egypt Month (Tour Egypt Monthly) - The Michael C. Carlos Museum


Volume II, Number 3 March 1st, 2001

Egypt Month exhibit editor deTraci Regula

deTraci Regula


The Michael C. Carlos Museum


Emory University
571 South Kilgo Street
Atlanta, Georgia 30322
U.S.A.
Telephone: +1 404.727.4282
Fax: +1 404.727.4292
Email: carlos@emory.edu

Museum Website: http://www.emory.edu/CARLOS/
Egypt Odyssey Website for Kids: http://www.emory.edu/CARLOS/ODYSSEY/EGYPT/homepg.html

Suggested donation: $5 per person

Hours: Mon-Sat 10am-5pm; Sunday Noon-5pm
Note: The Museum is closed during university holidays.

Opening April 22nd and running through January 6th, 2002, the Michael C. Carlos Museum presents "The Collector's Eye: Masterpieces of Egyptian Art from the Thalassic Collection, Ltd".

Gathered during a lifetime of collecting by Theodore and Araea Halkidis, most of the two hundred objects in this esteemed and sometimes controversial private collection have never been presented publicly before now. Items include artifacts from pre-dynastic times to artifacts from Cleopatra's time.

The vast majority of the objects are new to the public. A granite image of Ptah-Sokar-Osiris with the features of Amenhotep III was included as part of the recent touring exhibition "Pharaohs of the Sun." The statue is now rejoining the rest of the collection for this exhibit.

The general public will have a unique opportunity to peer behind the doors of the world of large-scale private collections when Theodore Halkidis shares his insights and anecdotes about building the Thalassic Collection when he appears as guest lecturer on April 27th, 2001 at 7pm.

Because of its close association with Emory University, the Carlos Museum offers frequent lectures on varied aspects of Egyptology. On March 19th, Dr. Wilma Wetterstrom will speak on "From Flowers to Pharaohs: Unraveling Mysteries of Ancient Egypt with Plants"; April 3rd features Dr. Peter Lacovara, Curator of Egyptian Art, speaking on a Middle Kingdom boat model on loan from the Semitic Museum at Harvard University. The museum also has an active children's workshop series with many sessions focusing on ancient Egypt.

The Carlos Museum has also recently acquired the Egyptian collection of the now-defunct Niagara Falls Museum in Niagara Falls, Canada. Among the items in this primarily late-period assortment is a male mummy which curator Peter Lacovara believes may be that of Ramesses I (1293-1291 b.c.e). This collection is off-exhibit at present but will be displayed this October after conservation is completed. A few pieces from the collection are being presented periodically at the museum, but the full display will be revealed for the first time in fall. At that time, most of the ten mummies and nine sarcophagi will be presented for public view.



The Nile, the Moon and Sirius: The Ancient Egyptian Calendar By Richard Weininger

The Egyptian Traveler's Survival Kit By Jimmy Dunn

The Tomb of Nefertari By Paul Groffie

Palace of the Sun King By Dr. Joann Fletcher

The Ecological Context of Ancient Egyptian Predynastic settlements By Michael Brass

Tunnel Vision By Ralph Ellis & Mark Foster

The Queens of Egypt - Part II By Dr. Sameh Arab

Cross Staff and Plumbline and the Great Pyramid By Crichton E M Miller

Editor's Commentary By Jimmy Dunn

Ancient Beauty Secrets By Judith Illes

Book Reviews Various Editors

Kid's Corner By Margo Wayman

Cooking with Tour Egypt By Mary K Radnich

Hotel Reviews By Juergen Stryjak

Egyptian Exhibitions By deTraci Regula

Egyptian View-Point By Adel Murad

Nightlife Various Editors

Restaurant Reviews Various Editors

Shopping Around By Juergen Stryjak

Web Reviews By Siri Bezdicek Prior Issues

February 1st, 2001

January 1st, 2001

December 1st, 2000

October 1st, 2000

September 1st, 2000

August 1st, 2000

July 1st, 2000

June 1st, 2000

Last Updated: June 9th, 2011

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