1-888-834-1448

The Treasures of King Tut's Mummy


The Treasures of King Tut's Mummy

by Jimmy Dunn

The golden hands are not as familiar to most readers as the golden mask.When a modern soldier goes into the field, he or she carries along, packed about their bodies, just about every conceivable item they might need for survival. When ancient Egyptian pharaohs died, likewise, they went forth into the netherworld with a host of equipment and survival gear.


Of course, there were many grand treasures spread amongst the chamber of King Tut's Tomb, but one of the most interesting aspects of King Tut's mummy is the vast array of items that were attached to the body to provide him with the magical protection that would allow him to pass into the netherworld. Either on the outside, or wapped within the layers of mummy bandages that encased his body were no less then 107 different items, some grand, some very small and insignificant, at least to us, and some function.

Most readers will be at least somewhat, if not very, familiar with his golden mask, today an gleaming icon of the young king. But this famous artifact is only one of many items found attached to his mummy.

In addition to the mask, a number of items adorned the outer layer of the mummy. Notably, a scarab of black resin, its base inscribed with the Book of the Dead spell 29b, hung suspended from the neck on a decorative gold band made up from odd trappings originally prepared for Ankhkheprure. Underneath this, a pair of burnished gold hands (no. 256b(1)), were sewn directly onto the mummy wrappings. They clasped the decayed crook and flail. Below them, just visible through the unguents, was a large gold ba-bird (no. 256b(2)). Once again, these had actually been prepared for Ankhkheprure, and were only subsequently taken over for use by Tutankhamun by cutting out some of the original names.

However, as the wrappings of the mummy were systematically removed, some 150 magnificent items of jewelry, superb amulets and other objects were brought to light. These had been fashioned and positioned according to the dictates of the Book of the Dead, and would ensure that the king's transformation from death to true immortality. Indeed, they would help make him immortal, at least in the minds of the modern public.

Upper Body artifacts
The Treasures of King Tut's Mummy
The Treasures of King Tut's Mummy
The Treasures of King Tut's Mummy
The Treasures of King Tut's Mummy
The Treasures of King Tut's Mummy

Y-shaped amulet

oval plaque

vulture collar

vulture and Uraeus collar

uraeus collar

falcon collar

two falcon collars

apron

dagger

girdle

T-shaped amulet

bracelet

faience broad collar

falcon collar

resin scarab

uraeus from 99

vulture head from 99

falcon collar

circlet

circlet

circlet

vulture bracelet

beads

falcon

collar

two falcon collars

beadwork

circlet

iron dagger

girdle

five finger-rings

falcon collar

bracelet with lapis barrel-bead

bracelet with iron wedjat-eye amulet

bracelet with carnelian barrel-bead

funerary papyrus?

four circlets

djed-pillar amulet

sandals, toe and finger stalls

wire bracelet

beadwork of 61

wedjat-eye bracelet

wedjat-eye bracelet

scarab bracelet

barrel-bead bracelet

scarab bracelet

disc bracelet

amuletic knot

bracelet with carnelian swallow

three finger-rings

barrel-bead bracelet

beaded bracelet

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

50

51

52

53

54

scarab bracelet

wedjat-eye bracelet

wedjat-eye bracelet

finger-ring

finger-ring

disc bracelet

tail

tyet-knot amulet

wadj-scepter amulet

djed-pillar amulet

double-leaf amulet

serpent amulet

leaf amulet

amuletic knot

uraeus collar

vulture collar

vulture and Uraeus collar

scarab pectoral

vulture pectoral

scarab pectoral

faience wedjat-eye

beads

falcon collar

falcon pectoral

wedjat-eye pectoral

bracelet

Anubis amulet

falcon-headed amulet

serpent-head amulet

Thoth amulet

wadj-scepter amulet

bead

chain

five pectoral clasps and pendants

human-headed winged uraeus amulet

double uraeus amulet

vulture amulet

vulture amulet

vulture amulet

vulture amulet

uraeus amulet

vulture amulet

bead collar

two fibrous fillets

diadem

temple band

linen headdress

uraeus insignia of 104 bis

vulture insignia of 104 bis

temple band

beaded linen skull-cap

conical linen pad

iron headrest amulet

55

56

57

58

59

60

61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

70

71

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

80

81

82

83

84

85

86

87

88

89

90

91

92

93

94

95

96

97

98

99

100

101

102

103

104

105

106

107

See Also:


Tut's Tomb

References:


Title

Author

Date

Publisher

Reference Number

Ancient Egypt The Great Discoveries (A Year-by-Year Chronicle)

Reeves, Nicholas

2000

Thmes & Hudson, Ltd

ISBN 0-500-05105-4

Atlas of Ancient Egypt

Baines, John; Malek, Jaromir

1980

Les Livres De France

None Stated

Chronicle of the Pharaohs (The Reign-By-Reign Record of the Rulers and Dynasties of Ancient Egypt)

Clayton, Peter A.

1994

Thames and Hudson Ltd

ISBN 0-500-05074-0

Complete Valley of the Kings, The (Tombs and Treasures of Egypt's Greatest Pharaohs)

Reeves, Nicholas; Wilkinson, Richard H.

1966

Thames and Hudson Ltd

IBSN 0-500-05080-5

History of Ancient Egypt, A

Grimal, Nicolas

1988

Blackwell

None Stated

Monarchs of the Nile

Dodson, Aidan

1995

Rubicon Press

ISBN 0-948695-20-x

Oxford History of Ancient Egypt, The

Shaw, Ian

2000

Oxford University Press

ISBN 0-19-815034-2

Tutankhamun (His Tomb and Its Treasures)

Edwards, I. E. S.

1977

Metropolitan Museum of Art; Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.

ISBN 0-394-41170-6

Valley of the Kings

Weeks, Kent R.

2001

Friedman/Fairfax

ISBN 1-5866-3295-7

Valley of the Kings

Heyden, A. Van Der

Al Ahram/Elsevier

Archives

Who are we?

Tour Egypt aims to offer the ultimate Egyptian adventure and intimate knowledge about the country. We offer this unique experience in two ways, the first one is by organizing a tour and coming to Egypt for a visit, whether alone or in a group, and living it firsthand. The second way to experience Egypt is from the comfort of your own home: online.