1-888-834-1448

Desert Word Search


Egypt Month children Editor Margo Wayman

Margo Wayman

 

 

A

F

H

E

A

T

S

Y

E

K

N

O

D

S

N

I

U

O

D

E

B

L

T

B

A

M

W

B

U

R

V

S

E

K

S

D

N

C

C

N

M

I

P

E

J

A

R

I

D

B

O

F

C

L

X

N

H

C

R

G

S

I

S

A

O

O

R

U

G

A

Q

R

H

A

R

K

B

J

P

D

D

C

Y

I

W

A

D

I

S

R

S

T

H

I

S

T`

L

E

F

C

S

T

O

X

Y

A

E

U

H

A

Z

T

B

K

C

O

V

S

C

W

Q

U

A

R

R

D

Y

E

M

E

F

Z

G

F

L

K

G

E

R

J

H

R

I

L

I

Z

A

R

D

S

E

C

C

A

A

S

M

A

W

A

A

W

B

D

D

S

M

P

C

S

W

A

D

O

B

C

E

A

L

E

E

A

R

D

I

I

U

M

S

S

F

E

L

A

M

J

C

A

R

A

V

A

N

S

M

S

B

E

M

K

H

T

R

I

G

H

E

A

C

D

B

L

S

S

N

O

I

P

R

O

C

S

C

L

WORD LIST FOR PUZZLE

  • Firecrackers

  • Acacias

  • Ghaf tree

  • Broomrape

  • Thistle

  • Wadis

  • Iris

  • Bedouins

  • Shrubbery

  • Caravans

  • Camels

  • Lizards

  • Donkeys

  • Oasis

  • Scorpions

  • Heat

  • Arid

  • Dunes

A Kid's Crossword Puzzle. Click Here

 

Shake Rattle and Roll

 

Sahl hid under the rock, trying to escape the heat of the desert's mid-day sun. The scorpion found relief in the darkness and dampness, and shut his eyes to rest. He'd go back out at night, when it was much cooler.

 

 

 

As he lay there resting, the ground beneath him started to shake. The rock above him rattled and rolled, and bounced around on the ground gently. Sahl squeezed his pliable body out from under the rock to see what was going on. He thought it was odd to see a cloud of dust headed towards him. Soon he was able to make out the shape of several camels. They were racing towards him. Before he could crawl back under the rock, there were dozens of hairy camel legs and hooves thudding the ground all around him, nearly crunching him. He was choking from the dust. He coughed and coughed and stayed close to the rock until they had all passed. "What was that?" he questioned. He turned and looked at the camels, but could just see a cloud of dust as they disappeared. His pointed stinger had curved up in the air and his large pincers on his front legs flung around wildly until he calmed himself down. "Hmm, a camel race," he muttered to himself. Feeling safe once more, Sahl climbed under the rock.

 

He sighed, shut his eyes and fell asleep. No sooner had he dozed off when the ground began to shake again. The rock above him rattled and rolled, and bounced around on the ground gently. "Not again!" he mumbled, and crawled out from under the rock to see what was going on. "More camels racing?" He flung his pincers up into the air, held his stinger up and watched as the cloud of dust came towards him. He began to choke as the thick dust surrounded him. The camel's hooves barely missed him as they hit the sand. He opened his eyes to see hairy legs all around him. He moved back against the rock and waited until the racing animals had passed. He turned and watched them disappear behind a sand dune, sighed and squeezed back under the rock. "I hope that's the end of it," he muttered. "How many camels are in this race anyway?" he added.

 

Again, the camels came running by. Again the ground beneath him began to shake. Again the rock above him rattled and rolled, and bounced around on the ground gently. "Oh, no!" he whined. Hesitantly, he crawled out from under the rock to find more dust, more hooves, more hairy legs, more nearly getting trampled. "That's it!" he exclaimed. "Time to go and find another rock!"

 

He ran across the burning sand, his pincers up and swinging, his tail with the pointed stinger up and curled over his back. He saw a bigger rock in the distance. He ran towards it. "Ah, I'll be safe here," he sighed with contentment. He crawled under the larger rock, feeling how cool it was, and lay down. He closed his eyes and fell asleep.

 

Soon the ground began to shake below him. Soon the rock above him began to rattle and roll, and bounce around on the ground gently. "How can this be?" he wondered as he climbed out from the rock. He stood against it and watched as the camels ran past. A huge boulder above him fell loose, shaken from the cliff by the vibration of the camels racing. It nearly smashed Sahl. He jumped to the side just in time. His heart was racing with fear. Sahl ran. He ran and he ran and he ran, until he was far away from the camels and far away from falling boulders.

 

He came to a pile of rocks. There were no cliffs about so he knew nothing could fall on him. He crawled under a rock that sat off by itself. He did not have to worry about dust choking him. He did not have to worry about hooves crunching him and he didn't need to watch out for hairy camel legs. He lay under the rock. He stayed there all day long, feeling safe that it wouldn't shake, rattle and roll.

 

There's Room For Everyone - Almost!

 

Hamzah was a big plump grub. His body was soft and squishy. He lived under the ground where he could stay moist and out of the hot desert heat. One day as he was moving along under the layer of sand, he saw some tunnels that led to a burrow deep under the ground. It was much bigger than he needed and there were lots of underground tunnels. Hamzah felt happy. There were a lot of things he could do in a big empty burrow with tunnels. He'd never have to go up into the hot sun, except occasionally to find a leaf or two to nibble on, then he'd just take them down to the burrow and eat there. He'd be safe too.

 

He inched his way deep down through the narrow, but long tunnels, until he reached the burrow. At first, he was a little nervous. What if there was a snake down there, or a big rat? After he reached the burrow, he peeked and saw nothing else was in there. He found a nice soft spot in the dirt, laid down and fell asleep.

 

The soft, furry gerbil ran across the hot sand, looking for somewhere to hide. An eagle was soaring high above and Haifa did not want to become its midday snack. She came upon a hole that led deep under the ground and ran inside. She found it a maze of tunnels, some going upward, some sideways and others straight down on a sharp diagonal. She ran through some of them, enjoying the safety offered, and it was much cooler. Her only fear was that maybe a snake or even a fox was also using this as its retreat from the heat.

 

Haifa found herself at the entrance to the large burrow. She stuck her head in and peaked. It was very dark inside and she saw nothing else in there except a fat juicy grub, so she scraped up some dirt with her tiny claws and lay down. She soon fell asleep.

 

Salma, a tawny colored scorpion, crawled out from under a rock. When she stepped on the sand, it felt nice and warm to her. She ran around, going from rock to rock, looking for a snack. Perhaps a fat mosquito would taste good, or a bluebottle fly. As she scooted across the sand she didn't see the hole leading into the dark tunnels below and fell inside. She slid on her back down deep. When she reached the bottom she stood up. It felt nice and cool in there. Out of curiosity, she made her way to the burrow. She peeked inside to make sure there were no snakes or foxes or large lizards. She saw Hamzah, the grub, sleeping in one of the corners. She spotted Haifa, the furry gerbil, sleeping in another. Feeling safe, and somewhat sleepy, Salma lay down in a pile of soft dirt she'd turned over with her huge front pincers and fell asleep.

 

Latifah, a long, greenish-brown lizard, stood above ground and yawned. She was bored. There just wasn't that much to do in the desert. There were a few flies buzzing around that she caught with her sticky tongue and she even managed to find a delicious scarab beetle to nibble on. In need of a drink, Latifah scampered across the burning sand in search of water. She came upon the hole to the tunnels and gazed into them. She listened carefully. She didn't want to go in there if there was a snake, or a fox, or a larger lizard, or perhaps even a huge rat. Hearing no sounds she ran in. She knew she'd have fun running around in them, exploring this new place. It was better than being bored up top, on the hot sand. She ran through the tunnels, going up and down, across and back, until she reached the burrow at the bottom. Cautiously she peeked inside. She could see Hamzah sleeping off in a corner. She spotted Haifa, lying on a pile of dirt. Salma lay in another part of the burrow. All three of them were sound asleep in the coolness of the deep hole. Feeling tired after all the exploring, Latifah lay down, not far from Salma, and fell asleep.

 

A while later, Hamzah woke up, he stretched his chubby, squishy body and yawned. Out of the corner of his eye he noticed something moving off to the side. His eyes focused on the snoozing scorpion. He stayed very still, terrified to move. His eyes glanced around and he spotted the gerbil. It was curled up in a ball, sleeping. He saw the lizard in the darkness. Terror overcame Hamzah. He wasn't alone!

 

One by one the animals woke up. Each of them stared at the others in awkward silence. Hamzah started screaming. He opened his chubby little mouth and let out a scream that shook the walls. Salma opened her mouth and let out an ear-piercing cry. Latifah followed, though hers was more of a hissing sound. Haifa jumped up in the air. She screeched a squeaky scream. The four of them stood there screaming until they could scream no more. Then they stopped and looked at each other. They were all afraid of each other.

 

Just then, they could hear a hissing sound coming down one of the tunnels. The four stood in horror as Samir, the snake, came slithering into the burrow. It curled up into a tight coil and looked at the four creatures. Hamzah looked at Salma. Salma turned and looked at Haifa. Haifa looked over at Latifah, who ran towards the closest tunnel and ran as fast as she could, until she reached the hot sand above and scooted into a pile of rocks.

 

Samir looked at the creatures in the burrow. His tongue slipped in and out of his mouth. Haifa, not waiting another second, jumped up into a tunnel and ran as fast as her little legs could carry her until she reached the hot sand above. She darted across the burning ground until she reached the safety of a cactus. She ran up into the sharp needles and hid. At least she was safe from the snake.

 

Samir looked at Hamzah and Salma. He opened his mouth. Salma used her pincers to pull herself up into the tunnel. She clambered up and up and up until she reached the top. She ran across the sand until she found safety under a rock.

 

Samir looked at the fat juicy grub and smiled an evil smile. His forked tongue darted in and out of his mouth. He began to slither towards Hamzah. Hamzah, unsure of what to do, inched his way over to the tunnel. He climbed up into it and began to slowly move through it. He inched his way across a long, straight tunnel, then up a steep sloping one. He turned around and saw the snake following him slowly, tormentingly. Hamzah could see the light of the sun ahead. He had to hurry. He inched his way as fast as a grub could move. He finally reached the tunnel and stood there, not sure which way to go. Samir came slithering out of the hole and stood, coiled and fangs showing, ready to pounce on poor little Hamzah. He was just about to strike when an eagle swooped down from a nearby date palm and carried Samir off in his beak.

 

 

 

Hamzah fell down with relief. Soon the others came out of hiding and stood near Hamzah. The four of them went back into the burrow, feeling safe at last and shared the coolness of the burrow and tunnels with each other. There was room for everyone. Well, almost everyone!

 

The Little Goatherd

 

Thamir lived in a large black tent in the desert. His family were Bedouins, nomadic Arabs who lived in the deserts of the Middle East. Thamir and his family lived in Egypt. Thamir's family owned a small herd of goats and a few camels. The goats were very important to them. They drank the goat's milk, made cheeses with it, and used the hair to make their tents. Thamir, the only boy in the family, had the job of taking the goats to graze every morning and bringing them back to the tent at night.

 

 

 

His mother and sisters spent their day making bread, weaving, embroidering and making jewelry to sell at the souk. Thamir's father worked taking care of the camels and other things that needed to be done.

 

One morning, as Thamir was preparing to take the herd of goats to graze, he looked up at the sky. It looked as though it might rain that day, which was very unusual in the Egyptian desert. He gathered his little flock and off he went, the goats following him.

 

Each goat knew Thamir. They knew his voice, they recognized his looks, and they always obeyed his orders and followed him wherever he went. After walking a few miles, Thamir arrived at his destination. There were acacia, tamarisk, and eucalyptus trees growing all along the wadi, and sprigs of mint and chamomile clustered around some large rocks, their roots digging for hidden moisture. A small pool of murky water was not far, a good place for the goats to drink.

 

Thamir let his flock disperse and sat back in the sand to watch them. Sometimes he got very bored, sitting there all alone. Sometimes he sang some songs, just like his ancestors had done thousands of years ago in the same desert. Sometimes he threw rocks at a tree, trying to hit it. Today he was very bored. He slid down onto his back. His bare feet dug into the hot sand. He looked up into the sky. There were a few clouds floating overhead. He thought one of them looked like one of the Great Pyramids. Another one looked like a ferocious lion. One looked like an old man, bent over with age, holding a cane. Thamir laughed at some of the formations he saw in the clouds.

 

He looked at his herd. He counted them to make sure they were all there. He saw several of them nibbling on the mint leaves. Thamir liked mint too. He walked over to them, patted them on the head and pulled a few leaves off for himself and popped them into his mouth. Some of the other goats were lying down in the shade of a tree, resting, filled with leaves and scrub they had been nibbling.

 

While he was walking around, Thamir saw a pretty rock. It glittered like gold. He picked it up and looked at it. He rubbed the sand off of it and put it into his pocket. Just then it began to rain. Drops splattered on his head. The goats all started to baa and bleat and run for cover under a tamarisk tree. The rain fell harder and harder and soon the ground was soaking wet. Thamir loved the rain.

 

After a while, Thamir heard a noise. It sounded like the deep roaring of a camel when it was angry, growing louder and louder. Soon he saw a wall of water coming towards him and his flock. He rushed up on the banks as water filled the wadi. It rushed past, tearing up tree branches and carrying them off in its torrent. Thamir was worried. His flock was on the other side of the now swiftly flowing river. He hoped they would stay away from it until it subsided.

 

It rained and rained for hours. The river raging down the once-dry wadi, became deeper and deeper and the water flowed faster and faster. The little herd of goats moved back, away from the banks of the ever-widening river and found shelter in a small cave, hidden among the rocks. Thamir sat on top of a huge boulder and sat on it, drenched from the cool rain.

 

After several hours the rains stopped. The river began to recede and soon it was just a gentle flowing stream. Thamir carefully crossed over the stream until he was at the other side with his herd of goats. They jumped all over Thamir, licking him with joy and excitement that he was with them again.

 

They walked back to the tent. Thamir's mother, sisters and father were happy to see him and all their goats.

 

The next morning when Thamir was going to take the goats to graze, he looked up at the sky. There were no clouds. He was relieved. He headed off with the flock and much to their delight, the entire wadi was filled with fresh grasses and leaves. The rains had brought new life to the wadi and to the desert. Wildflowers bloomed everywhere. As the goats grazed and nibbled on the tender shoots, Thamir knew he wouldn't be bored today. He walked through the flowers, smelling them and marveling at the beauty of the desert.

 

That night he picked a bouquet of sweet, fragrant flowers and took them back to his mother and sisters. Mother put them in a jug of water and set the jug on the wooden slab they used as a table. The family ate goat cheese and fresh bread that night. Thamir snuck a few pieces to his goats. That night he went to bed, a happy little goatherd.

 

The Caravan

 

The man bent over and picked up the heavy bags filled with precious spices, like cinnamon, black pepper, vanilla and cocoa, and loaded them on the back of the camel. He then brought smaller bags filled with frankincense, gold, precious stones, pearls, myrrh, tea, grains and the finest cloths made of silk. He even tossed a heavy carpet made of goat hair onto the camel's back. There were over a hundred camels in the caravan and each was carrying many of the same things, ready to travel the long hot drive across the desert's sandy dunes. The camels began their trek, loaded with goods. Their masters, who were called grooms, led the camels as they began their adventure. Only the first camel in the seemingly-never-ending line carried a groom. The other grooms walked and the other camels were loaded too heavy to carry a person. The camel at the very end of the train wore a bell. It wasn't around his neck, but was rather large and hung on a stick that lay across his saddle. The bell would always clang when the camels walked, so that the grooms would know the entire train was together and none wandered off.

 

Farah, the camel, was feeling tired. It wouldn't be long before her baby would be born. It might even be while they were walking the trade route paths. She plodded on with the others for several days and nights. They always traveled at night and slept during the day, when it was too hot to travel. Camels don't like the hot weather. Neither did the grooms.

 

 

 

 

The sun was just rising above the horizon. The camel train stopped to rest in the shade of the trees at a small oasis. The goods were taken off their humps. Farah lay down to rest. She was very tired.

 

When the groom went by a few hours later to feed them, much to his surprise, next to Farah lay a baby camel. The groom smiled, stroked the little camel and urged him to get up and walk. He'd have to follow his mother or he would die in the heat of the desert. Faisal got up and wabbled around, his legs rubbery and weak. The groom kept him walking and after just a couple of hours, he was able to run around.

 

When the sun went down behind the horizon, the camels were roused, loaded again and off they went, Little Faisal followed behind. He walked and walked and walked. His mother kept looking back at him to make sure he followed. She fed him whenever they stopped to rest. Faisal had a hard time. His new and not-so-strong little legs were tired. His mother was worried about him, but he stayed behind her and walked the whole night.

 

That morning, as the sun rose again, the camel train stopped at their destination. The grooms unloaded all the precious goods off the camel's backs and took them to the markets to sell. Farah walked over to the shade of a date palm and lay down. Faisal lay down next to her. She was so proud of him. He moved over and lay his head on her tummy and fell asleep. She was so proud of her baby camel. Tomorrow they would be loaded up again and begin their trek to some new and distant land. Perhaps the groom would let Faisal carry something on his back. Farah smiled as she looked at the sun shining high in the desert sky. It was the beginning of a new day, and a new life in the camel train for Faisal.

 

What's Up?

 

Najlaa reached up to eat the leaves off a tree. Its branches were dangling over the concrete block fence that she stood by. She had a long neck for an ostrich, and soon noticed it was getting rather stiff from reaching up to the tender shoots bursting from the woody branches. She ignored her discomfort and kept nibbling away. When she was finished, Najlaa went to pull her head down and couldn't bend it. She tried and tried. She moved it to the left, but it was too stiff. She moved it to the right, but it was too stiff. She moved it forward, then backward, but her neck was rigid and wouldn't bend. She had no choice but to walk around looking up into the sky, until the stiffness wore off.

 

 

 

Ramad, a furry ginger and gray cat came walking by. He saw Najlaa looking up into the sky. He wondered what she was looking at. He stopped right next to her and looked up. He saw some puffy white clouds floating by. He watched them as they slowly passed, and noticed they changed shapes. At first, one looked like a lion, then it changed shape to look like a tree. Ramad watched for a while, meowed happily, then lost interest and ran away.

 

A little while later, as Najlaa stood gazing upward, a cow, mooing and chewing its cud, came by. Adiba noticed the ostrich staring up into the sky. She wondered what she was looking at. Adiba stopped next to Najlaa and lifted her head. A flock of ducks flew above them. She stared at them and noticed they were flying in a V-formation. Adiba let out a loud moo and walked away, her tail swishing behind her as she headed for the field to graze.

 

Najlaa tried to move her head to the left, but it was still too stiff. She tried to move it to the right, but it was still too stiff. She moved it forward, then backward, but her neck was still too rigid and wouldn't bend.

 

The puffy white clouds that were floating by soon thickened, turned gray, and it began to sprinkle. Hafiz, the ram, came running by. He was on his way to play with some of the other sheep that were grazing at the nearby oasis. He saw Najlaa standing there, looking up at the clouds. Hafiz stopped near the ostrich and looked up to see what she was looking at. Raindrops fell onto his face. They ran down from Najlaa's beak and long neck and splattered on him. It began to rain harder and harder. Najlaa ran over and stood under a banana tree to protect her from the downpour. Hafiz, getting drenched, let out a loud and angry baa and ran off.

 

Kalila was swinging through the trees, her long hairy arms holding onto the palm fronds as she moved from tree to tree. The baboon grabbed hold of a clump of green bananas and pulled a few off to munch on. She looked down and saw Najlaa standing under the tree, looking up at her. She waved at her, but Najlaa didn't raise a feather to wave back. She just stood there gazing up at Kalila.

 

Najlaa tried to move her head to the left, but it wouldn't move. It was still stiff. She tried to move it to the right, but it wouldn't move. It was as stiff as ever. She tried to move it forward, then backward, but it still wouldn't move. What was she going to do? Her neck was so stiff. All she could do was look up at Kalila in the banana tree.

 

Kalila dropped a banana and it hit Najlaa right in the head. Najlaa couldn't move at all. The banana split open and banana squished all over her head. Kalila dropped another, then another, but finally, tiring of her banana dropping, she swung off to another tree, leaving Najlaa standing under the palm, looking up into the tree.

 

Najlaa walked over to the cement block wall. She lay her neck on the top of it, to give it a rest. Jibril, the mongoose, was running along the top of the wall and came right up to Najlaa's face. Her beak was inches away from Jibril. Jibril stopped, waiting for Najlaa to lift her head up so he could run by, but she was too tired. Jibril turned around on the wall and ran backwards. He'd have to go another way.

 

Elmira, the frog, came hopping along the top of the wall a short while later. She saw Najlaa's face laying on it. She stopped and waited patiently for her to lift up her face, but she wouldn't. Elmira simply jumped over Najlaa and hopped on her way.

 

The sun began to set in the sky. Najlaa, too tired to move, fell asleep against the wall. When Jamal, the donkey came walking by the next morning, he brayed loudly. Najlaa lifted up her head to see what the noise was. Her neck moved! She was able to move it to the left, she was able to move it to the right. She was able to move it forward and backward. She was so happy. She curled her head right down between her legs and laughed and laughed.

 

She'd had enough looking up into the sky and trees. She walked around all day, looking down at the ground below her and enjoying every minute of it.

 

This Way and That Way

 

In the arid desert west of the Nile River, lived a camel. It was the most unusual camel in Egypt. It had one hump like all the other dromedaries, four legs like all the others, but instead of one neck and head, it had two. The right head belonged to Kharouf and Khaliq was on the left.

 

Each of them had their own thoughts, their own ideas, and their own likes and dislikes. Kharouf liked to eat lemons, pomegranates and dates. Khaliq liked to eat oranges, bananas and figs. Kharouf liked to drink water from the river, where the water was fresh and clean and flowed swiftly. He enjoyed watching the fish swim under the water as he sipped. Khaliq liked to drink water from the pond, where the water was still, He thought it was fun to watch the frogs hopping across the lotus pads.

 

Each neck and head fought for control of the body. This caused a lot of arguments. Khaliq liked to sleep in the shade of some of the ancient temples that stood around the desert. Kharouf liked to sleep near the tents of the Bedouins, where he felt safe. There was fighting, fighting, fighting, all the time, about which way they would go and what they were going to do.

 

One day they stood by a tall tree arguing. Khaliq was nibbling on some figs. Kharouf felt hungry so he wanted to go to the date palm and nibble on sweet dates. Khaliq didn't want to do that. He was enjoying his figs. He grabbed hold of the branches with his strong jaw and teeth and wouldn't let go. Kharouf pulled and pulled with his neck, but Khaliq wouldn't let go; he held on tight all day and all night. He even fell asleep holding on to it. Kharouf was very angry but there was nothing he could do about it. He eventually gave up and fell asleep too.

 

During the night, a hot wind blew and carried sand from the desert to where the camels stood sleeping. When Khaliq woke up he saw that they were buried in sand up to their mouths. Khaliq was still holding onto the fig tree branch. He let go and began to cough. His mouth was filled with sand. It was stuck to his teeth, up his nostrils and in his fur. The coughing woke Kharouf up. He moved his head to look about, but couldn't move it very far as it was buried in the sand. They cooperated long enough to try to move their body, but they couldn't get out, they couldn't move.

 

Kharouf was also very hungry. He'd not eaten any lemons, pomegranates, or dates since the morning before and was starving. Khaliq wasn't as hungry as he'd eaten a few dates. Still stuck in the sand and having not much choice, Kharouf reached up and ripped a fig off the tree with his teeth. Hesitating for a few moments, he began to munch on it. He chewed it for a moment and realized that it tasted rather delicious. He chewed and chewed until it was gone. Khaliq watched in surprise as Kharouf reached up and tugged another fig off the tree. Khaliq joined him and together the two-headed camel ate fig, after fig, after fig.

 

When they had their fill of figs, they decided to wriggle about and get their body out of the sand. They wiggled to the left and they wiggled to the right, then did it again and again until they'd freed themselves from their sand prison. They climbed on top of the deep sand and plodded along.

 

The top of a pomegranate tree was sticking out of the ground. Some large, juicy fruit was lying on the sand. Since Kharouf had tried some of his favorite food, figs, Khaliq decided to try some of Kharouf's pomegranates. He picked one up off the ground with his long, furry neck and gobbled it down. Much to his surprise and delight, it tasted delicious.

 

They tried some more of each other's favorite foods and found out that they both liked them all. Why had they been so stubborn? Kharouf sipped water from the pond and found it quite tasty. He too enjoyed watching the frogs hopping about and croaking. When they went down to the river, Khaliq stuck his head down for a sip. He saw the catfish and Nile perch swimming about as he lapped up water with his long slimy tongue. He laughed as they blew bubbles under the water and darted about through the hidden reeds.

 

Life was much better for the two-headed camel when they learned to cooperate with each other instead of always fighting over who gets their way. That night, when the sun went down behind the horizon, and darkness covered the land, the decision had to be made over where they would sleep. Would it be near the ancient pyramids where Khaliq liked to sleep, or near a bedouin's tent, where Kharouf enjoyed sleeping.

 

The fighting began. Kharouf leaned to the right and pushed with his long neck towards the tent. Khaliq leaned to the left and pushed with his long neck towards the pyramid. Neither of them got anywhere. They just stood still, in the darkness of the desert, fighting, both too stubborn to give in. The midnight sky filled with stars. The moon shone down on the land and as the night passed and the sun once again came up over the horizon, the camel with two heads still stood there, on the warming sands, fighting over where they would sleep. You can't win them all!.

 

Desert Recipes

 

Sand Tart Cookies

  • 1/2 lb. butter (no margarine), softened

  • 4 c. flour

  • 2 c. sugar

  • 3 eggs

  • 1 t. vanilla

  • 1 1/4 t. salt

Place the softened butter into a bowl. Add sugar, cream well. Add eggs and mix. Add salt and vanilla. Gradually add the flour while stirring the mixture. When well mixed, place in refrigerator.

 

Roll the dough and cut into shapes. Take egg white from one egg and brush onto cookies. Bake 8 minutes at 350'.

  • Rosy Apples

  • 6 medium apples

  • 2 c. sugar

  • 1/4 lb. tiny red cinnamon candy hearts

  • 3 c. water

Pare and core apples. Place in pan with all other ingredients. Boil slowly. Apples will look red and rosy. Serve topped with whipped cream.

 

Sahara Croquettes

  • 1 lb. ground beef

  • 1 egg

  • 1 egg yolk

  • 3 T. bread crumbs

  • 2 T. oil

  • 1 T. chopped parsley

Put the ground beef in a bowl. Add the egg and the parsley. Mix together and make into patty shapes. Put the egg yolk in another dish and the bread crumbs in another....Beat yolk. Dip in beaten yolk and then in breadcrumbs... Heat oil and fry till golden brown.

 

Sandstorm Tarts

  • 4 slices bread

  • 1 can pineapple chunks

  • 1/2 c. sugar

  • 1/2 c. butter

  • whipping cream as desired

Drain the pineapple. Spread half the butter on one side of the slices of bread. Sprinkle with sugar. Melt the rest of the butter in pan over low heat. Put the bread slices in with the buttered side up. Cover and fry for ten minutes. Remove from pan, cool. Arrange pineapple on bread. Top with whipped cream.

 

Lamb on Vine Leaves

  • 8 grape leaves

  • 2 T. olive oil

  • 1/2 lb. lamb, cut into bite sized pieces

  • 2 medium onions, chopped

  • 1/2 t. allspice

  • salt

  • pepper

  • 1/4 c. pine nuts

  • juice of one lemon

Soak the grape leaves and squeeze dry, then towel dry. In frying pan heat oil and saut meat and onions. Season with allspice, salt and pepper. Place four of the leaves in greased casserole dish. On top spread the meat mixture. Sprinkle with pine nuts, cover with remaining leaves. Sprinkle with lemon juice. Bake in oven, 350 degrees for 5 minutes. Place dish in pan of water, and bake 30 minutes. Serve over rice.

 

Traditional Bedouin Wedding Feast

  • 1 medium camel

  • 1 medium North African goat

  • 1 lamb

  • 1 large chicken

  • 6 eggs

  • 450 cloves of garlic

  • 1 bail of fresh coriander

  • 25 lbs almonds

  • 25 lbs pine nuts

Take the prepared chicken and stuff with the eggs, which should be hard boiled, the almonds and pine nuts. Sprinkle with coriander. Stuff the lamb with the chicken. Stuff the goat with the lamb. Stuff the camel with the goat. Spike with the garlic and brush with butter before cooking. Spit roast over a charcoal fire in an arid desert area for best results...

 

 

The Queens of Egypt, Part I By Dr. Sameh Arab

The Ancient Egyptian Scribe By Ilene Springer

Editor's Commentary By Jimmy Dunn

Ancient Beauty Secrets By Judith Illes

Book Reviews Various Editors

Kid's Corner By Margo Wayman

Cooking with Tour Egypt By Mary K Radnich

Hotel Reviews By Juergen Stryjak

Egyptian Exhibitions By deTraci Regula

Egyptian View-Point By Adel Murad

Nightlife Various Editors

Restaurant Reviews Various Editors

Shopping Around By Juergen Stryjak

Web Reviews By Siri Bezdicek

 

Prior Issues

January 1st, 2001
December 1st, 2000
October 1st, 2000
September 1st, 2000
August 1st, 2000
July 1st, 2000
June 1st, 2000

 

Last Updated: June 13th, 2011


Who are we?

Tour Egypt aims to offer the ultimate Egyptian adventure and intimate knowledge about the country. We offer this unique experience in two ways, the first one is by organizing a tour and coming to Egypt for a visit, whether alone or in a group, and living it firsthand. The second way to experience Egypt is from the comfort of your own home: online.